Colorado

  • July 18, 2024

    DaVita To Pay $34M In Medicare Kickback Whistleblower Suit

    Dialysis company DaVita will pay more than $34 million to settle a Medicare fraud case over alleged kickbacks doctors received in exchange for patient referrals, after a whistleblower from the company's C-suite came forward, the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Colorado announced Thursday.

  • July 18, 2024

    Insults Fly As Attys Beef Over Ex-NFL Player's Sex Abuse Suit

    Attorneys for an ex-NFL player and the former controller for his reptile shipping company accused each other of stonewalling, dishonesty and running up litigation costs at a hearing Thursday, where a Colorado state judge largely ignored the lawyers' "speeches" and urged them to confer more meaningfully.

  • July 18, 2024

    Tribes Move Step Closer To $5B Water Rights Settlement

    Leaders of the Navajo Nation and the Hopi and Southern San Juan Paiute tribes have signed a landmark settlement agreement that proposes to bring reliable, safe and clean drinking water to the tribes as they await final approval of a $5 billion federal bill that backs the same endeavor.

  • July 18, 2024

    Oil Co. Can't Get Contract Breach Claim Revived

    A Colorado federal judge on Thursday declined to revive an oil and gas company's lawsuit accusing the American Arbitration Association of improperly terminating a claim the company filed against its investors for nonpayment of arbitration costs, ruling it agreed to the AAA's "rather capacious" rules.

  • July 18, 2024

    Live Nation Previews Part Of Case Against DOJ Suit

    Live Nation and Ticketmaster have teed up part of their fight against an antitrust lawsuit brought by the U.S. Department of Justice and multiple state attorneys general, arguing that the state law claims are "threadbare" and that a chunk of the DOJ case amounts to trying to force them to deal with competitors.

  • July 18, 2024

    Atty Says Golf Malpractice Row Already Ran Its Course

    An attorney seeking summary judgment in a legal malpractice suit told a New York federal judge that, five years and three courts later, the owners of the Foothills Club West Golf Court have still failed to produce evidence to support their allegations.

  • July 18, 2024

    Xcel's Silence Led To $2.6M Storm Penalty, Gas Co. Says

    A natural gas marketing company is suing the Colorado Public Utilities Commission and Xcel Energy in state court to invalidate a nearly $2.6 million penalty for its failure to ship enough gas during a historic 2021 winter storm, alleging Xcel didn't notify it of the regulatory proceedings.

  • July 18, 2024

    Colo. Injury Firm, Insurer End Bad Faith Suit

    Two months after a Colorado personal injury firm and insurer settled a dispute over coverage of litigation costs, the two sides have agreed to dismiss the firm's lawsuit against a former firm attorney accused of trying to steal its entire class action department.

  • July 18, 2024

    Healthcare Co. Says Fired In-House Atty Lacks Standing To Sue

    Kidney care company Panoramic Health has urged a Colorado federal judge to toss a former assistant general counsel's lawsuit that claims she was fired for raising concerns about violations of federal anti-kickback statutes.

  • July 18, 2024

    Colo. Judge Ends Voter Intimidation Case Midtrial

    A Colorado federal judge on Thursday put an abrupt end to a bench trial in a lawsuit accusing members of a 2020 election denier group of illegal voter intimidation, concluding there was not enough evidence to back up the claims brought by voting rights groups.

  • July 17, 2024

    Colo. Federal Judge Tells Attys To Focus On Fundamentals

    U.S. District Judge S. Kato Crews told a room of attorneys Wednesday he's concerned by the sloppiness of veteran lawyers he's witnessed in the past year, prompting him to be more of a stickler on procedure than when he was a magistrate judge.

  • July 17, 2024

    Workers Claim Trucking, Visa Cos. Ran Labor Scam

    Two African immigrants have accused a trucking company and an immigration services firm of running a yearslong enterprise to force workers from abroad to perform dangerous and unsafe work.

  • July 17, 2024

    Railroad Can't Halt Damages Bid After Union Drive Firings

    Two workers who were fired after backing a union organizing effort can continue seeking punitive and compensatory damages against a railroad, a Colorado federal district court ruled, supporting a magistrate judge's conclusion that blocking the damages request would "eliminate a significant deterrent."

  • July 17, 2024

    Ex-NFL Player Is Broke, Hasn't Paid Settlement, Plaintiffs Say

    A former NFL player's business partner has asked a Colorado state court to enforce a settlement after the ex-linebacker allegedly blew the deadline to make a $200,000 payment, a request that comes as a plaintiff in another case claims the player and his reptile shipping company are insolvent.

  • July 17, 2024

    Colo. Firm Says Ex-Director Stole Clients While On Payroll

    Colorado boutique Whitcomb Selinsky PC is accusing one of its former directors of trying to steal clients while he was still employed with the firm to take with him to his new practice.

  • July 16, 2024

    FTC's In-House Kroger Case Delayed Until After Fed Suit

    Kroger and Albertsons are getting a limited respite from the Federal Trade Commission's looming in-house merger challenge after an agency administrative law judge agreed to delay the case, but only until immediately after an Oregon federal court fight plays out.

  • July 16, 2024

    Marathon Beats Ex-Worker's Gender Discrimination Case

    A Colorado federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by a former Marathon Petroleum human resources supervisor who claimed she was forced out for inappropriate behavior while male coworkers got a free pass, finding that the supervisor's conduct was worse than the male colleague who she claimed received preferential treatment.

  • July 16, 2024

    Influencer's Forest Pics Not 'Work Activity,' 10th Circ. Rules

    A Tenth Circuit panel on Tuesday reversed a social media influencer's conviction for unauthorized work on National Forest Service property after he posted Instagram photos of himself snowmobiling on closed NFS land, finding that the influencer didn't have fair warning that what he was doing might be considered a federal crime.

  • July 16, 2024

    No 'Racial Animus,' Nuggets Claim In Bid To Toss Fan's Suit

    The fan accusing the NBA's Denver Nuggets of racial profiling did not prove that a team employee showed any "racial animus" when he questioned the validity of his ticket at a game last December, the team said as it urged a Colorado federal judge to toss the case.

  • July 16, 2024

    Cold Brew Co. Inks Deal To End IP Suit Against Mug Maker

    A Colorado federal judge has signed off on a cold brew equipment maker and insulated mug company's request to dismiss a trademark infringement suit after the companies agreed to end the fight and pay for their own costs.

  • July 16, 2024

    The 2024 Diversity Snapshot: What You Need To Know

    Law firms' ongoing initiatives to address diversity challenges have driven another year of progress, with the representation of minority attorneys continuing to improve across the board, albeit at a slower pace than in previous years. Here's our data dive into minority representation at law firms in 2023.

  • July 16, 2024

    These Firms Have The Most Diverse Equity Partnerships

    Law360’s law firm survey shows that firms' efforts to diversify their equity partner ranks are lagging. But some have embraced a broader talent pool at the equity partner level. Here are the ones that stood out.

  • July 15, 2024

    10th Circ. Rejects Okla. Title X Funding Cut Challenge

    A Tenth Circuit panel on Monday rejected Oklahoma's challenge to federal cuts of its Title X funding over the state's refusal to provide referrals for abortions, affirming it was likely the state knowingly and voluntarily accepted the Department of Health and Human Services' requirements for the grant funding.

  • July 15, 2024

    Colo. Judge Asks If Campaign Limits Hinge On Experts

    A Colorado federal judge wondered Monday who had the right to decide whether political corruption is enough of a problem to justify state campaign contribution limits, questioning the weight of expert opinion in a bench trial over the constitutionality of those limits.

  • July 15, 2024

    Crocs Dodges Clog Competitor's Counterclaims In IP Battle

    A Colorado federal judge has tossed a pair of counterclaims alleging anticompetitive conduct by Crocs in the shoe company's intellectual property lawsuit against a smaller rival, with the judge concluding that the rival never claimed Crocs said anything untrue or in bad faith.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • A Look At State AGs Supermarket Antitrust Enforcement Push

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    The ongoing antitrust intervention by state attorneys general in the proposed Kroger and Albertsons merger suggests that states are straying from a Federal Trade Commission follow-on strategy in the supermarket space, which involved joining federal investigations or lawsuits and settling for the same divestment remedies, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • Colo. Ruling Adopts 'Actual Discharge' Test For The First Time

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    After a Colorado court’s recent decision in Potts v. Gaia Children, adopting for the first time a test for evaluating an actual discharge claim, employers must diligently document the circumstances surrounding termination of employment, and exercise particular caution when texting employees, says Michael Laszlo at Clark Hill.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

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    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • In Memoriam: The Modern Administrative State

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    On June 28, the modern administrative state, where courts deferred to agency interpretations of ambiguous statutes, died when the U.S. Supreme Court overruled its previous decision in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council — but it is survived by many cases decided under the Chevron framework, say Joseph Schaeffer and Jessica Deyoe at Babst Calland.

  • Opinion

    It's Time For Nationwide Race-Based Hair Protections

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    While 24 states have passed laws that prohibit race-based hair discrimination, this type of bias persists in workplaces and schools, so a robust federal law is necessary to ensure widespread protection, says Samone Ijoma and Erica Roberts at Sanford Heisler.

  • How To Clean Up Your Generative AI-Produced Legal Drafts

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    As law firms increasingly rely on generative artificial intelligence tools to produce legal text, attorneys should be on guard for the overuse of cohesive devices in initial drafts, and consider a few editing pointers to clean up AI’s repetitive and choppy outputs, says Ivy Grey at WordRake.

  • Constitutional Protections For Cannabis Companies Are Hazy

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    Cannabis businesses are subject to federal enforcement and tax, but often without the benefit of constitutional protections — and the entanglement of state and federal law and conflicting judicial opinions are creating confusion in the space, says Amber Lengacher at Purple Circle.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Various Paths For Labor And Employment Law

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    Labor and employment law leans heavily on federal agency guidance, so the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to toss out Chevron deference will ripple through this area, with future workplace policies possibly taking shape through strategic litigation, informal guidance, state-level regulation and more, says Alexander MacDonald at Littler.

  • Series

    Boxing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Boxing has influenced my legal work by enabling me to confidently hone the skills I've learned from the sport, like the ability to remain calm under pressure, evaluate an opponent's weaknesses and recognize when to seize an important opportunity, says Kirsten Soto at Clyde & Co.

  • Opinion

    Industry Self-Regulation Will Shine Post-Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Loper decision will shape the contours of industry self-regulation in the years to come, providing opportunities for this often-misunderstood practice, says Eric Reicin at BBB National Programs.

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